Łukasz Langa

ambv on Github. Python core developer, Python 3.8 release manager, creator of Black, pianist, dad. Likes analog modular synthesizers, immersive single-player role playing games (Fallout, Elder Scrolls), and single malt Scotch whisky.

Python Steering Council Panel

With: Paul Everitt, Barry Warsaw, Benjamin Peterson, Emily Morehouse-Valcarcel

Python & Libraries, Intermediate
8/17/2019 | 11:45 AM-12:30 PM | Mya

Description

Elected as prescribed in PEP 8016, the Python Steering Council is a 5-person committee that assumes a mandate to maintain the quality and stability of the Python language and CPython interpreter, improve the contributor experience, formalize and maintain a relationship between the Python core team and the PSF, establish decision making processes for Python Enhancement Proposals, seek consensus among contributors and the Python core team, and resolve decisions and disputes in decision making among the language.

This session will be moderated by , Paul Everitt (Python Software Foundation), to introduce a discussion with members of the community. Barry Warsaw (Steering Council), Łukasz Langa (3.8 Release Manager), Emily Morehouse (Core Dev), Benjamin Peterson (2.7 Release Manager)

Abstract

Barry Warsaw: Barry Warsaw is a Sr. Staff Engineer with LinkedIn, working on the Python Foundation team. He has been a core Python developer since the first workshop at NIST in 1994. As the first non-Dutch contributor, he's been dubbed Python's Terry Gilliam. In 2009, he became the FLUFL (Friendly Language Uncle For Life) via the humorous PEP 401. Today, he is one of 5 members of the Python Steering Council, helping to provide leadership for the future of Python.Barry has served as Python Release Manager, Jython project leader, and GNU Mailman project leader. He served as co-chair of the Pycon Language Summit for 4 years. He currently mentors new contributors on their journeys to becoming core developers. Outside of Python, Barry is a semi-pro bass player, and studies tai chi.

Benjamin Peterson: Creator of six (http://pypi.python.org/pypi/six), a Python 2 and 3 compatibility library. Release manager for Python 2.6 and 2.7.

Emily Morehouse: Emily Morehouse-Valcarcel is the Director of Engineering at Cuttlesoft, a digital product agency focused on creating beautifully designed software. Her passion is driven by a blend of empathy, strategy, curiosity, and human-centered design. She's a Python Core Developer, avid OSS contributor, and constant learner focused on building tools to automate the mundane and shed light on the complexity of the human experience. Emily holds degrees in Computer Science, Criminology, and Theatre from Florida State University.

Lukasz Langa: ambv on Github. Python core developer, Python 3.8 release manager, creator of Black, pianist, dad. Likes analog modular synthesizers, immersive single-player role playing games (Fallout, Elder Scrolls), and single malt Scotch whisky.

Paul Everitt: Paul is the PyCharm Developer Advocate at JetBrains. Before that, Paul was a co-founder of Zope Corporation, taking the first open source application server through $14M of funding. Paul has bootstrapped both the Python Software Foundation and the Plone Foundation. Paul was an officer in the US Navy, starting www.navy.mil in 1993.

The latest with BLACK, so you can stop worrying about Formatting

Python & Libraries, Intermediate
8/18/2019 | 2:25 PM-2:55 PM | Mya

Description

What good is a code style if it's not internally consistent? What good is a linter when it slows you down? What if you could out-source your worries about code formatting, adopt a consistent style, and make your team faster all at the same time?

Come hear about Black: a new code style and a tool that allows you to format your Python code automatically. In the talk you'll learn not only how the style looks like but why it is the way it is. I will do my best to convince you not only that it's good but that it's good enough. You'll see how you can integrate it with your current workflow and how it speeds up your life while making your code prettier on average.

Lose your attachments, delegate the boring job of moving tokens around to satisfy the linter, and save time for more important matters. Guaranteed to increase the life expectancy of space bars and Enter keys on your new MacBook's keyboard.

Abstract