David Blank-Edelman

David has over thirty years of experience in the SRE/DevOps/systems administration field in large multiplatform environments. He is the author of the O'Reilly Otter book (Automating Systems Administration with Perl) and the editor/curator of "Seeking SRE: Conversations on Running Production Systems at Scale" (published by O'Reilly in August 2018). David is one of the co-founders of the now global set of SREcon conferences.

Speaker home page

Finding Your Place in SRE and SRE in Your Place

DevOps & Automation, Intermediate
8/18/2018 | 1:30 PM-2:00 PM | House Canary

Description

People often speak of Site Reliability Engineering as a monolithic thing that is implemented a specific way and performed by these hard-to-hire people with powers and abilities far beyond those of mortal (people). Don't you believe it! Let's find a place that works for you in SRE and a way to do SRE that works for your organizational context.

Abstract

People often speak of Site Reliability Engineering as a monolithic thing that is implemented a specific way and performed by these hard-to-hire people with powers and abilities far beyond those of mortal (people). Don't you believe it! This engineering discipline at the heart of operational resiliency in many orgs has a much richer story than that.

In this talk I'd like to share some key things I've learned while putting a book together on SRE that looks at the diversity of implementations of this operational best practice and the human factors that are a key part of its success. Let's find a place that works for you in SRE and a way to do SRE that works for your organizational context.

Lost Treasures of the Ancient World

DevOps & Automation, Novice
8/19/2018 | 4:15 PM-4:45 PM | Fisher

Description

In the deep, not-so-dark recesses of a former employer's data center lives an ancient server. This server was central to their infrastructure for years before I arrived and was still in active use after I left, 19 years later. Scared yet?

Abstract

In the deep, not-so-dark recesses of a former employer's data center lives an ancient server. This server was central to their infrastructure for years before I arrived and was still in active use after I left, 19 years later. Scared yet?

With the permission of its owner, I began an archeological excavation with this server as my dig site. What could I learn by studying the contents of a machine